New SEMI Semiconductor Standards Aim to Deter Counterfeiters


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New SEMI Semiconductor Standards Aim to Deter Counterfeiters

Other Standards Deal with MEMS, FPD, and PV Industry

SAN JOSE, Calif. – November 2, 2009 – SEMI has published three new technical standards applicable to the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Two of the new standards help deter counterfeiting by validating the integrity of goods from non-certified distributors/suppliers. These new standards help trusted manufacturers of authentic goods use strongly-encrypted batch numbers. Using a free authentication service, anyone considering the purchase of a batch of goods can use the encrypted batch number as the basis for a validation check. Secure serialization is a major deterrent to counterfeiters— and an early warning system if theft of codes occurs.

Three other completely rewritten SEMI Standards are now available, and they include standards relevant to both the semiconductor and MEMS industries.

The new and the revised standards were developed by technical experts from equipment and materials suppliers, device manufacturers and other companies participating in the SEMI International Standards Program. The standards are available for download purchase at www.semi.org. They are also available through a new SEMI Standards product called SEMIViews, an online Web 2.0 service enabling access to SEMI International Standards 24/7 from any location. For more information, visit www.semi.org/semiviews.

SEMI Standards are published three times a year. The new standards, part of the November 2009 publication cycle, join more than 780 standards published by SEMI during the past 35 years.

“Counterfeit products in semiconductor manufacturing are profitable, so counterfeiters will continue to break the law. But now we have an early warning system if counterfeiting occurs,” said James Amano, Director, SEMI International Standards, “so more counterfeiters will be caught and punished. Plus, reduced counterfeiting will result in increased downstream manufacturing yield and less down time.”

The list of new SEMI Standards includes:

SEMI T20.1 — Specification for Object Labeling to Authenticate Semiconductors and Related Products in an Open Market

SEMI T20.2 — Guide for Qualifications of Authentication Service Bodies for Detecting and Preventing Counterfeiting of Semiconductors and Related Products

SEMI E153 — Specification for AMHS SEM (AMHS SEM)

In addition to the three new standards, three SEMI Standards were completely rewritten:

SEMI MS2 — Test Method for Step Height Measurements of Thin Films

SEMI MS4 — Standard Test Method for Young’s Modulus Measurements of Thin, Reflecting Films Based on the Frequency of Beams in Resonance

SEMI T20 — Specification for Authentication of Semiconductors and Related Products

As part of the July 2009 publication cycle, these three SEMI Standards were released:

SEMI D54 — Specification for Substrate Management of FPD Production (SMS-FPD)

SEMI E152 — Mechanical Specification of EUV POD for 150 mm EUVL Reticles

SEMI PV2 — Guide for PV Equipment Communication Interfaces (PVECI)

The SEMI Standards Program, established in 1973, covers all aspects of semiconductor process equipment and materials, from wafer manufacturing to test, assembly and packaging, in addition to the manufacture of flat panel displays, photovoltaic systems and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). More than 2,100 volunteers worldwide participate in the program, which is made up of 19 global technical committees. Visit www.semi.org/standards for further details about SEMI Standards.

About SEMI:

SEMI is the global industry association serving the manufacturing supply chains for the microelectronic, display and photovoltaic industries. SEMI member companies are the engine of the future, enabling smarter, faster and more economical products that improve our lives. Since 1970, SEMI has been committed to helping members grow more profitably, create new markets and meet common industry challenges. SEMI maintains offices in Austin, Beijing, Brussels, Hsinchu, Moscow, San Jose, Seoul, Shanghai, Singapore, Tokyo, and Washington, D.C. For more information, visit www.semi.org

Association Contact:

Steve Buehler/SEMI
Tel: 408.943.7059
Email: sbuehler@semi.org

Editor’s Note: Here is detailed information about the three new SEMI Standards.

SEMI T20.1 — Specification for Object Labeling to Authenticate Semiconductors and Related Products in an Open Market

Problem: The component supply chain is contaminated by counterfeit and tainted products. When authorized/certified distribution networks run out of product (due to supply shortfalls or terminated products), the risk of procuring contaminated goods increases. Purchasing policy may force procurement from non-certified distributors.

Solution: The new standard helps validate the integrity of goods from non-certified distributors/

suppliers. The purpose of this specification is to describe the object labeling by trusted manufacturers of batches of authentic goods with strongly-encrypted batch numbers (license plate). However, the solution also involves free authentication service, available to anyone considering purchase of a batch of goods, using the encrypted batch number as the basis for validation check.

SEMI T20.2 — Guide for Qualifications of Authentication Service Bodies for Detecting and Preventing Counterfeiting of Semiconductors and Related Products

Problem: Same as SEMI T20.1 (above)

Solution: The guide addresses the free authentication service, available to anyone considering purchase of a batch of goods, using the encrypted batch number as the basis for validation check. It describes the qualifications required for an authentication service body (ASB) to certify the authenticity of the encrypted serial number. It includes security requirements and ASB communication requirements.

SEMI E153 — Specification for AMHS SEM (AMHS SEM)

Problem: Integration of AMHS SEM equipment into an automated semiconductor fab is difficult due to lack of host interface standardization and equipment, transport and storage discrepancies.

Solution: This new standard facilitates the integration of AMHS SEM equipment into an automated (e.g., semiconductor fabrication) factory by defining an operational model. The model includes a standard host interface and equipment operational behavior and extends to include traffic management characteristics, parallel interface for carrier transfer (SEMI E84), transport and storage system controller architecture, and delivery of the transfer unit.

Information about the three SEMI Standards that were completely rewritten:

SEMI T20 — Specification for Authentication of Semiconductors and Related Products

Problem: Same as SEMI T20.1 (above).

Solution: This specification covers structure, behavior, and services for the organizations involved in authentication of semiconductor and related products through the use of secure serialization. Secure serialization is a major deterrent to counterfeiters—and an early warning system if theft of codes occurs. Less counterfeiting results in increased downstream manufacturing yield and less down time.

SEMI MS2 — Test Method for Step Height Measurements of Thin Films

Problem: Step-height measurements are used to determine thin-film thickness values. Thickness measurements help in the design and fabrication of MEMS devices and also are used to obtain thin-film material parameters, such as Young’s modulus. Currently, it is difficult to determine the step-height measurements of thin films.

Solution: The new test method helps determine the step-height measurements of thin films, making it easier to design and fabricate MEMS devices. It applies only to films, such as those found in MEMS materials, which can be accurately imaged using an optical interferometer or comparable instrument with the capability of obtaining topographical 2-D data traces.

SEMI MS4 — Standard Test Method for Young’s Modulus Measurements of Thin, Reflecting Films Based on the Frequency of Beams in Resonance

Problem: Young’s modulus is a material parameter used in the design and fabrication of MEMS and ICs, but results between laboratories cannot easily be compared. In 2007, the first Young’s modulus standard became available (SEMI MS4-1107) for use with a single-beam laser Doppler vibrometer, but procedures with a dual-beam laser Doppler vibrometers were not covered.

Solution: This new test method is now applicable to a dual-beam laser Doppler vibrometer. It applies only to films, such as found in MEMS materials, that can be imaged using a non-contact optical vibrometer or stroboscopic interferometer.

Information about the SEMI Standards July 2009 publication cycle releases:

SEMI D54 — Specification for Substrate Management of FPD Production (SMS-FPD)

Problem: Other standards are developed based on the condition that materials are supplied to equipment by cassettes and carriers. This standard is based on the idea of a single substrate transfer, and it can be used in semiconductor, FPD, and MEMS industries.

Solution: This standard defines standard communication sequences (such as information on glass substrate and transfer of processing conditions between host and equipment) at transfer points where glass substrates are transferred into and out of the FPD manufacturing equipment. This standard applies to automated production lines, where multiple cassettes and carriers are no longer relevant. With this single substrate transfer standard, equipment startup and development costs are reduced.

SEMI E152 — Mechanical Specification of EUV POD for 150 mm EUVL Reticles

Problem: Lack of standardization of the mechanical interface requirements for reticle handling and protection method (EUV-pod reticle carrier) in Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography.

Solution: This standard streamlines EUVL mask infrastructure by establishing seamless reticle handling between manufacturing steps which may use different tools. In addition, it provides a framework for innovating technical solutions, to protect the reticle from contamination without using the traditional polymeric pellicles. With no technical solution to keep the mask clean during its use, EUVL technology cannot exist. This standard is a technology enabler because it streamlines EUV reticle infrastructure, providing a framework that allows innovation of reticle protection technology.

SEMI PV2 — Guide for PV Equipment Communication Interfaces (PVECI)

Problem: The PV industry lacked a unified communication standard between production equipment and the shop floor. Major production line processes could not be fully automated by shop floor IT systems that rely on communications with production equipment.

Solution: The new standard marks a significant industry milestone as it defines a unified equipment communication interface for PV production systems. It will benefit the PV industry by reducing ramp-up times, increasing functionality, simplifying requirement specifications, and increasing cost savings for manufacturers.

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